Columns

Proton Pump Inhibitors: Are we doing no harm?
Proton Pump Inhibitors: Are we doing no harm?

Ongoing stomach and digestive problems can be miserable for patients – and are a common cause for visits to a health care professional. Patients are often looking for a prescription to help ease their symptoms and health care professionals want ...

Posted: November 17, 2014|Evidence Matters|0 comments

Flu vaccines and Ebola relief – do we have duties to get and to give?
Flu vaccines and Ebola relief – do we have duties
to get and to give?

Kevin Reel is one of Hospital News' ethics columnists. His column appears quarterly. Over 40 years ago, philosopher and ethicist Peter Singer published an article called "Famine affluence and morality". The piece argued that we ought to give, generously, to ...

Posted: November 4, 2014|Ethics|0 comments

Education program enhances dementia care
Education program enhances dementia care

Before every shower, Jerry* would resist, kick, hit and yell. Staff at The Scarborough Hospital (TSH) couldn’t understand why bathing caused him such anxiety. A dementia patient on the hospital’s mental-health unit, his methods of communicating discomfort were limited to ...

Posted: November 2, 2014|Nursing Pulse|0 comments

Engaging heads, hearts and hands
Engaging heads, hearts and hands

Sue Denomy (right) is President and CEO at Bluewater Health. Would your employees recommend your hospital as a great place to work, learn and grow? Would they say that they trust your organization? Bluewater Health is the largest public sector employer ...

Posted: November 1, 2014|From the CEO's Desk|0 comments

When providing care, put the patient into perspective
When providing care, put the patient into perspective

Irene Wald How did 80-year old Ambrose Wald fall out of a hospital chair specifically designed to stop patients from falls? It's a question to which his daughter Irene Wald, a nurse of almost 35 years, has never received an ...

Posted: October 18, 2014|Patient Safety|0 comments

Navigating confidentiality with suicidal youth
Navigating confidentiality with suicidal youth

Confidentiality has long been a cornerstone of professional ethics; in medicine it can be traced all the way back to the Hippocratic Oath. It stems from the recognition that patients (or clients) will reveal very personal and sensitive information to ...

Posted: October 11, 2014|Ethics|0 comments

Docusate for constipation: Money down the toilet?
Docusate for constipation: Money down the toilet?

Constipation. It’s not something we often talk about in polite conversation but, given how common it is, perhaps we should. As much as one quarter of all adults suffer from it, and an estimated three out of every four seniors ...

Posted: October 6, 2014|Evidence Matters|1 comment

When culture gets in the way of change
When culture gets in the way of change

Ken Tremblay The health care system is awash in a laundry list of change imperatives: patient-centred; funding reform; integrated care; stakeholder engagement; clinical and technological innovation; population health, among many others. No matter the cause or outcome, central to the ...

Posted: October 4, 2014|From the CEO's Desk|0 comments

The right to die?
The right to die?

Just before noon on a Monday, Gillian Bennett dragged a mattress from inside her British Columbia home to her favourite spot outside, on her property. She drank some whiskey and Nembutal with water, and then held her husband’s hand as ...

Posted: October 1, 2014|Editor's Note|0 comments

Examining the “weekend effect” at Canadian hospitals
Examining the “weekend effect” at Canadian hospitals

Patients admitted to acute care hospitals on the weekend have slightly higher odds of dying than those admitted on weekdays, according to a recent report by the Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI). Weekend Admissions and In-Hospital Mortality takes an in-depth look ...

Posted: September 3, 2014|Data Pulse|0 comments

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