Humber River Physiotherapist honoured with U of T Recognition Award

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Andrew Lockwood is passionate about delivering care in a clinical setting.

As a Physiotherapist in the Allied Health Program at Toronto’s Humber River Hospital (HRH), Lockwood enjoys working with a diverse and highly-skilled group of people.

“One of the best parts of my job is that I have the opportunity to work with a unique, multidisciplinary and supportive  team,” said Lockwood, who was born and raised in Bermuda and credits his island upbringing to his early interest in team sports and eventual career in physiotherapy.

“Growing up in Bermuda, I was exposed to many different outdoor team sports, including lacrosse, cricket and rugby,” noted Lockwood, who’s been providing continuity of care on the medical inpatient unit at Humber River for almost three years.  “Learning to interact with various people and personalities in sport has helped me to become a strong team player in many environments,” he added.  “At Humber River, teamwork is essential to delivering quality care and service to our patients and community.”

Though he’s too modest to admit it, teaching and helping others are also valuable traits Lockwood has demonstrated throughout his career.

At the end of January, Lockwood’s teaching was honoured when he received a 2012 University of Toronto, Department of Physical Therapy Recognition Award for Clinical Instruction.  The award recognizes the significant and valued contribution of an individual to the education of Physical Therapy students at the University of Toronto.

Lockwood was nominated by Kirstie Gillanders – a current U of T Physical Therapy student who worked with Lockwood during a clinical placement at Humber River last spring.

“As a Clinical Instructor, Andrew went above and beyond; he consistently made an effort to ensure I was always comfortable and encouraged me to take on challenges that were outside of my comfort zone to foster further development,” said Gillanders, who is set to graduate this spring.  “Andrew also arranged my schedule accordingly so that I could observe procedures and then made it possible for me to follow the same patient postoperatively with another therapist so I could see the continuum of care,” she added.  “As a student, it means a lot to have a clinician be that invested in your education and go beyond expectations to provide the best learning experience possible.”

“As a colleague, Andrew is one-of-a-kind,” said Debbie Wood, also an HRH Physiotherapist who works alongside Lockwood with medical inpatients.  “With empathy, consistency and professionalism, Andrew readily gains the trust of his patients and their families.  He’s an excellent listener, a true team player and is very generous with his time,” she added.  “If someone is away sick, Andrew is the first one to volunteer to work an extra shift.  With a positive attitude and exemplary desire to deliver extraordinary care, Andrew always goes the extra mile.”

“Andrew contributes a combination of academic excellence and solid clinical experience to Humber River,” said Sang Choi, Manager of Humber River’s Allied Health Program.  “He’s a dynamic team player with an excellent work ethic and sound teaching skills, always collaborating well with patients and staff to promote patient and family-centred care at our hospital.”

Whether in a teaching role or liaising with colleagues during rounds, Lockwood is thrilled with the variety of clinical opportunities he’s received at Humber River and is grateful to be working with such an outstanding, supportive and close knit team.

As for what the future holds:

“I’ve come a long way since taking a ferry boat to school and riding around Bermuda on the back of my Dad’s moped,” joked Lockwood.  “Humber River is building North America’s first fully digital hospital and I’m really excited about that.  I know this kind of facility will help our team to deliver enhanced care to our community and provide us with greater resources to further strengthen our teaching relationships with the U of T and beyond.   I see myself always working in a hospital setting – there’s nowhere else I’d rather be.”